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Organic is Better!

 Although eating conventionally grown fruits and vegetables is better than skipping fruits and vegetables altogether, it is important to minimize your exposure to the pesticides contained in conventionally grown foods as much as possible for good health. Pesticides pose various health dangers and have been linked to nervous system toxicity, cancer, hormone system effects, and skin, eye and lung irritation. Conventional farming methods are also damaging to our environment and local economies. By consuming organic fruits and vegetables, you improve your health and support more sustainable farming practices.

 How to Obtain Organic Produce

 There are several ways to obtain organic produce. You can of course continue shopping at your  grocery store or go

“When we support organic farming, our dollar supports a cause that is sustainable, healthy, and loving.”

 to Whole Foods and purchase organic foods there, but perhaps the price tags scare you away. The Environmental Working Group has created a guide that currently lists 49 items ranked from least contaminated to most contaminated. Simply by eating the least contaminated conventional produce and avoiding the twelve most contaminated fruits and vegetables or replacing them with the organic option, you can lower your pesticide consumption by nearly 80% and hopefully keep your grocery bill in check.  The twelve most contaminated conventionally grown items to be avoided from most to least contaminated are: 

  • Celery
  • Peaches
  • Strawberries
  • Apples
  • Blueberries (Domestic)
  • Nectarines
  • Sweet bell peppers
  • Spinach
  • Cherries
  • Kale/collard greens
  • Potatoes
  • Grapes (Imported)

 You can access the full list here: http://www.foodnews.org/fulllist.php.

 Another option is to grow some of your own produce. If you’ve got the space and enjoy gardening, this could be a good way to go. However, it will require some research and materials and an upfront cost to get started. Of course, you’d be saving quite a bit over the long run as a packet of seeds costs about two dollars and will yield more than the one pound you’ll get at the store for the same price.

 A co-operative, on the other hand, leaves the farming to others while you sit back and enjoy abundant amounts of organic produce. A co-operative is a community effort that supplies local and organic produce at wholesale prices. Rawfully Organic Co-op, a non-profit, is one such example. Rawfully Organic Co-op “[supports] a raw food lifestyle, our local farmers, and our local economy!” By purchasing either a half-share ($47) or a full-share ($87) on their website, you receive a huge enough amount to last you and your household at least a week, depending on your consumption and size of household.

 Another co-op in Houston is Central City Co-op. This co-op offers a variety in sizes of produce shares  that are less expensive than Rawfully Organic; however, membership is required (there are different levels of membership, some costing more than others, and you can also volunteer in exchange for membership). I recommend asking around and doing some research on the co-ops in your area.

Conclusion

 Yes, please skip the chocolate sprinkle donut and extra-butter microwave popcorn (I don’t care if it’s whole grain) for the conventional apple if you need to, but hopefully you can start introducing more and more organic foods into your diet using the methods discussed above.

As stated by Rawfully Organic Co-op, “When we support organic farming, our dollar supports a cause that is sustainable, healthy, and loving.” Go organic and achieve good health while being kind to the environment.

– Roma Singh

Sources:

http://www.foodnews.org/

http://rawfullyorganic.com/index.php

http://www.centralcityco-op.com/

We want to promote healthy and conscious eating. In our last vegetarian class many of us contributed with some recipe. This was Sabrina’s raw food contribution.

As you know, the moment we cooked foods, they lose their very sensitive enzymes and many times nutrients. So they more alive these foods are, the higher their nutritional value and energy.

 This is all about bringing the highest energy into our diets. Enjoy something fresh for the warm days are coming…!

Ingredients

4 broccoli stems, washed and peeled

6 inch long piece of daikon radish, peeled

2 kiwis, peeled and dicedbroccoli-slaw

2 large carrots, peeled

2 cloves garlic, minced

½ bunch green onions, chopped

2 tbsp pine nuts, toasted

¼ tsp. ground black pepper

2 tbsp water

Black sesame seeds

 Directions: Coarsely grate broccoli stems, daikon radish, and carrots and put in a bowl. Add green onions, kiwis, pine nuts, garlic, salt, pepper, and water to bowl and toss together. Adjust seasoning to taste, and transfer to serving bowl. Garnish with black sesame seeds.

Vegetarianism was arguably created by the Vegetarian Society in 1840. They claim it came from the word in Latin ‘vegetus’ meaning “lively”, because this is how this diet make vegetarians feel. Vegetarianism has been in existence way before the mid 19th century. There are entire cultures that have been vegetarians and have live that way for generations. Many of us find it very difficult to be vegetarians, or even conceive only eating vegetarian. However, we all realize the importance of eating healthy and including all the characteristics of vegetarianism (sporadically!) in our daily meals. As a society we are starting to realize, now, more than ever, the important that food has on our health, state of mind, energy levels, and most importantly on our planet. The recent nomination to an Oscar as BEST Documentary of the movie FOOD, Inc. has triggered a new wave of awareness and consideration of the different aspects of where our food comes from. It is after all, the most significant green or ecological gesture we can produce daily.

So, we thought we would add some delicious vegan soup to your repertoire. We present to you, our infamous zucchini soup.

Zucchini SoupZucchini Soup

2 medium size organic zucchinis

¼ cup of Virgin Olive oil

2-3 cups of water

Pinch of rosemary

Pinch of pepper

Pinch of Cayenne Pepper

1 tablespoon of aminos (salt replacement)

1 pinch of hing (garlic replacement)

¼ cup of pine nuts (optional, or other nuts)

 

Directions: Bring enough water to cover the zucchini to boil. Add the rosemary, black pepper, aminos. Place the zucchini in the water until it changes color (darker green) and become lightly cooked. Let it cool for 5 minutes until ready to be blended. Place it on the blender with cayenne pepper and hing.  Add the cold olive oil. Blend until smooth. As a touch of taste you may broil or lightly heat the pine nuts to add flavor and texture as you serve.

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  • 6:30 pm - Mantra Chanting
  • 7:00 pm - Hatha Yoga
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